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Great FileFactory Premium deals on right now-Oct 3/18

Post by Webscout » Wed Oct 03, 2018 7:35 am

Great FileFactory Premium deals on right now

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New USMCA Trade Deal Will Raise Canada's Duty-Free Limit to $150

Post by Webscout » Wed Oct 03, 2018 11:04 am

New USMCA Trade Deal Will Raise Canada's Duty-Free Limit to $150

By Ambia Staley
October 2, 2018
The new trade agreement between Canada, the United States, and Mexico has been dominating the news lately, but there is one update coming that online shoppers will want to take note of. Under the new trade agreement, Canadians shopping online will see their duty-free limit raised to $150.00 and the new sales tax limit set at $40.00.

Previously, both the duty-free limit and tax limit were set at $20.00, a limit that has remained unchanged since 1985.


What Does This Mean?

In simple terms, this new limit means that Canadians ordering U.S. goods online will not have to pay duties on products costing $150.00 or less. Any items over that threshold will be subject to an average 2% duty.

However, the number that shoppers will want to pay attention to is the tax limit. The new agreement will see the tax limit raised to $40.00, but anything over that limit is still subject to the sales tax of your province.

For example, someone in Ontario who orders a $100.00 item online from the U.S. will not be subject to a minimal duty fee -- approximately $2.00 based on the 2% average (although duty costs can vary by item). However, they will still have to pay the 13% in sales tax charged in their province, or an extra $13.00 on top of their purchase.


Who Does This Apply To?

These new limits will only apply to U.S. goods bought online. If you take a trip across the border, you are still subject to the current exemptions -- $200.00 for a 24 hour trip, or $800.00 for trips over 48 hours.

It's also important to note that the new rules will only apply to packages shipped by private couriers such as FedEx and UPS, and will not apply to packages shipped by Canada Post.


When Will the New Limits Take Effect?

Don't adjust your holiday shopping lists just yet. While the new duty and tax limits have been announced, it could still be a long time before Canadian shoppers can start taking advantage of it.

The USMCA agreement is now subject to a 60-day review in the U.S. Congress. If all goes well in all three nations, the deal is expected to be signed at the end of November. After that, the Canadian government will need to introduce legislation so that the deal can be ratified and implemented, which could take months. Basically, if there are no delays, Canadians may see these new rules implemented before the parliamentary session ends in June 2019. If it gets delayed, USMCA could become an issue for the 2019 federal election and be delayed even longer.

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Re:Weed--effects..

Post by Webscout » Wed Oct 10, 2018 11:48 am

Nine harm-reduction points to make with your teen about marijuana

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https://www.theglobeandmail.com/cannabis/article-nine-harm-reduction-points-to-make-with-your-teen-about-marijuana/
What Canada’s doctors are concerned about with marijuana legalization

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https://www.theglobeandmail.com/cannabis/article-what-canadas-doctors-are-concerned-about-with-marijuana-legalization-2/

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Hyundai’s Kona Electric

Post by Webscout » Mon Oct 15, 2018 4:43 pm

Review: At the right price, Hyundai’s Kona Electric could challenge the Chevrolet Bolt

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https://www.theglobeandmail.com/drive/reviews/new-cars/article-review-at-the-right-price-hyundais-kona-electric-could-challenge/

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Milking it!

Post by Webscout » Thu Oct 18, 2018 9:24 am

Agropur launches ad campaign to keep milk consumers buying ’100% Canadian'
ERIC ATKINS
PUBLISHED OCTOBER 17, 2018
UPDATED 2 HOURS AGO
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One Quebec-based dairy producer is waving the Canadian flag as it tries to defend its market against milk imported from the United States.

Agropur, maker of Natrel milk, launched the campaign targeting Fairlife LLC, a U.S. dairy brand distributed by Coca-Cola Co., shortly after Canada agreed to let in more foreign dairy products in the proposed North American free-trade deal.

“Is your milk 100% Canadian or 100% American?” the Agropur ad reads, beneath two glasses of milk respectively labelled Natrel and Fairlife sitting on coasters bearing the Maple Leaf and the Stars and Stripes.

Fairlife milk began selling in Canadian markets on Sept. 4, said a spokeswoman for Coca-Cola, which announced in June it will spend $85-million to build a Fairlife milk plant in Peterborough, Ont. The factory is scheduled to open in 2020, and will be supplied by Ontario’s dairy farmers. Until then, the Fairlife milk in Canadian dairy aisles comes from U.S. cows.

David Wiens, a Manitoba dairy farmer and vice-president of the Dairy Farmers of Canada, said the Canadian government granted the U.S. company a special permit to import dairy products to build its market ahead of the plant’s opening. “Our hope is this will create new markets,” he said.

Graham Lloyd, chief executive officer of Dairy Farmers of Ontario, said the group that represents the province’s dairy farmers has an agreement to supply milk to the plant when it opens in 2020.

“Coke has declared and it is the Coke model that they prefer to use domestic sourcing for all of their products, and so we look forward to working with them in that regard,” Mr. Lloyd said.

Fairlife bills its milk as a premium, lactose-free product that is highly filtered and processed to boost protein and reduce sugar. It also makes banana, strawberry, coffee and chocolate-flavoured dairy drinks.

Mr. Lloyd said Fairlife’s “premium” products have quickly become popular in the United States with consumers who are not traditional milk drinkers, offering the possibility of widening the market share for Ontario dairy farmers. “We value working with processors like them and we encourage them to come to Canada and start processing,” Mr. Lloyd said.

Shannon Denny, a spokeswoman for Coca-Cola, said the special import permit is temporary. The company is about to break ground on the new factory, “which demonstrates our commitment to be a part of the Canadian dairy industry for the long-term.”

Véronique Boileau, a spokeswoman for Agropur, said consumers care where their milk comes from, and the ad, which has appeared in The Globe and Mail, tries to underline that. “When you purchase from Agropur you are contributing to the Canadian economy,” Ms. Boileau said.

The proposed United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement unveiled two weeks ago grants U.S. producers 3.6-per-cent more access to Canada’s protected dairy market. Domestic dairy farmers bitterly lament the concessions, noting Canada has recently ceded about 10 per cent of its market under recent trade agreements, including the European Union and Pacific Rim pacts.

Canada uses high tariffs and small import quotas to protect its producers of milk, poultry and eggs. Farmers’ prices are fixed by producer groups and output is matched to consumption.

It’s a system farmers say protects them from price volatility while ensuring they meet market demand. Critics say the supply-managed regime artificially inflates prices, prevents exports and discourages innovation.

The dairy industry has long used its marketing budgets to promote milk as a healthy drink and to combat declining consumption rates. Now, it finds itself defending its shrinking market against bigger players with deeper pockets and lower costs of production.

“You’re already getting push-back on the announced trade deal for dairy, because they’ve known it’s coming,” said Alan Middleton, a professor at York University’s Schulich School of Business. "It's certainly a sign of fear.”

He predicted the access given to U.S. dairies is just the start of demands for what could amount to “massive” exports of U.S. dairy products.

He said it is tough to make people care about where their milk comes from, but Canadian producers might be partly successful defending their markets if they can highlight consumers concerns over how the milk is processed, or what goes into it.

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Globe editorial: Why we must always denounce countries that silence their critics

Post by Webscout » Thu Oct 18, 2018 11:25 am

Globe editorial: Why we must always denounce countries that silence their critics

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https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/editorials/article-globe-editorial-why-we-must-always-denounce-countries-that-silence/

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